Macabre2 (Sherrod Colsne Mysteries)

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"The Weerwolf Problem" (Dutch spelling) forces Monty Weston, assistant, and de facto son to Colsne, to reassess all that he had come to accept about the monsters that had once been part and parcel of most people's belief systems prior to The Industrial Revolution, and the subsequent explosion of "scientific" discovery. No less nerve rattling is the truth behind a series of freakish animal deaths in Upstate New York, found in "The Golden Dart."

free kindle book Macabre2 (Sherrod Colsne Mysteries)
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Format Kindle ebook
Published 23 Nov 2012
Pages 38
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Book Details

In Macabre2 Sherrod Colsne finds himself confronted with circumstances and events that shatter his own steely sensibilities. Contrary to the openly stated of many in the latter 20th and early 21st centuries, ghouls, ghosts, and other horrors frequenting the nightmares of those who consider themselves to be otherwise rational and "scientifically" minded, are just as real and frightening today, as they were in the 19th and preceding centuries.

In The Weerwolf Problem (Dutch spelling), Monty Weston, assistant, friend, and surrogate son to Colsne, finds that he must reassess all that he had come to accept about the monsters that had once been part and parcel of most people's belief systems prior to The Industrial Revolution, and the subsequent explosion of "scientific" discovery. Colsne himself tells Monty about it, beginning rather cavalierly, but the facts he relates tell a story of their own, and by the end of his narrative we realise that his petahertz-speed (Monty's assessment of Colsne's reasoning) mind was at least as shaken as Monty was shocked at the very nature of the tale. Indeed, Colsne's experience, and his resulting deductions, gives a scientific explanation to a horror that by the latter part of the 20th century had become, in most people's minds (at least what they would admit publically), pure myth, fairy tales to scare and excite children. In point of fact it is a twisting, a distorting of accepted science, but then is not every new "scientific discovery" seemingly so?

No less nerve rattling is the truth behind a series of freakish animal deaths in Upstate New York, found in The Golden Dart. In this affair, or case, Monty joins Colsne from the outset. Colsne's genius early on divines the likely answer, but for those who have followed the first two in his casebook it is not in the least surprising. Nonetheless, the grotesque and vicious nature of the villainy is sufficient to shake the hearts and souls of most who follow his untangling of the monstrous web of deceit and greed. There are two maxims which fall apart at the solution to The Golden Dart: Part one, "Beauty is truth...," from John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn; and two, truth is golden, an adage of timelessness that has been condensed from several sources, not the least of which is the term applied to a Biblical teaching of Jesus Christ, the golden rule, and as well known to many, Aristotle's "golden mean." In the end, the monstrous truth of this tale is in fact golden, but—

Books by John Yantiss

Code Name: Erelim (Sherrod Colsne Mysteries)

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Sir Guy Hugo de May, Marquis of Maubrey, now President and CEO of Tower Of London Aegis, or TOLA, is in Jacksonville, Florida for a conference with an American partner firm, Biocon, and Organic Processing Technologies, Inc., a rival enterprise claiming that it owned the rights to a very special CPU, or at least the bio-electrical materials and manufacturing procedures used in producing it. That CPU, with SW developed by TOLA, form “Erelim."

Murder by Bequest (Sherrod Colsne Mysteries (non-sequential))

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On a frigid Friday afternoon in February, Eleanor Harkness shows up at the door of the “granite palace,” Sherrod Colsne’s New York townhouse. Her unexpected yet incredibly fateful and ironic appearance not only knocks Colsne’s normally unflappable assistant, Monty Weston, off stride, but takes both of them down a winding path of romance, past and present, and decades-old, bitter hatred.